(Last Updated On: March 4, 2017)
  • Tormod Granheim, 42, summited Everest in one day and decided to ski down it
  • Amazing footage shows him hurtling down 60-degree slopes past mountaineers 
  • However, his dream day turned into a nightmare when his companion skier fell
  • Tomas Olsson fell from around 27,000 feet to his death after an ice anchor failed

Incredible footage has caught the moment a daredevil skier hurtled from the top of Everest down near-vertical slopes. The clip shows extreme Norwegian explorer Tormod Granheim plunging down heart-stoppingly precarious icy passages. At one point he plummets through a narrow couloir, then passes a line of gobsmacked mountaineers trudging upwards.

Skiing Everest

Tormod Granheim from Norway summited Everest in just one day and pushed the boundaries even further by deciding to make history as the first to ski down the North Face of the awe-inspiring peak

 

The most nail-biting moment occurs when Granheim teeters on the edge of a 60-degree slope with powdery snow falling under his skis as he prepares to dive down

The most nail-biting moment occurs when Granheim teeters on the edge of a 60-degree steep rocky ledge with powdery snow falling under his skis as he prepares to dive down. Another frame of footage shows the adventurer whizzing past the camera at high speed. He told MailOnline Travel that he was on Everest’s North Ridge at this point, zipping along at around 23,950 feet above the cloud line.

A later clip shows Granheim niftily navigating Everest’s North Col – a sharp-edged pass carved by glaciers in the ridge connecting Mount Everest and Changtse in Tibet.It was the first time anyone had skied down the North Face, but this wasn’t the only mind-boggling feat Granheim achieved that day, more than a decade ago.

A clip shows Granheim niftily navigating Everest’s North Col

The sharp-edged pass carved by glaciers is found in the ridge connecting Mount Everest and Changtse in Tibet

Another frame of footage shows the adventurer whizzing past the camera at high speed – he was on Everest’s North ridge at this point, zipping along at around 23,950 feet

He also managed to summit the peak in one day. He rapidly ascended the mountain from the Tibetan side, scarpering up from Advanced Base Camp – 20,997 feet above sea level – to the 29,028ft summit.

The gruelling trek, known as the Mallory route, usually takes climbers around five days to complete.

However, the adventurer revealed at an event attended by MailOnline Travel recently that his ‘dream’ adventure soon turned into a nightmare when his Swedish skiing companion, Tomas Olsson, fell to his death while making the nail-biting descent.

Recalling the chain of events, Granheim, 42, said: ‘We managed to climb Everest with our skis from the Tibetan side in a day to the summit.

‘It’s like magic when you reach the top and so beautiful you just want to stay up there.

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Granheim said he wishes he had more footage from the adventure that took place ten years ago, the technology wasn’t as advanced as it is today

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Video footage captures Granheim’s skiing adventure down Everest, with a group of mountaineers seen ahead

Tragically Granheim lost his skiing partner, Tomas Olsson, during the ski run and was forced to make his way down the slopes alone

‘But we also had the urge to ski off the summit. We managed to ski down and follow the Great Couloir, negotiating our way through the crevices.

‘We passed a bunch of mountaineers and they didn’t know what to make of us. They thought we were crazy. ‘To do this project was a big dream for me and my friend Tomas. ‘I thought it would be the best day of my life but it wasn’t.’At about 27,000 feet my friend fell off the mountain and of course he didn’t make it.’

While he started his story with a cheeky smile and a sparkle in his eye, Granheim suddenly took a more grave tone as he touched on the traumatic day, adding that ‘it was really tricky to move on from the experience’.

Apparently, Tomas Olsson had been rappelling down a 150ft rock cliff at around 27,887 feet when a snow anchor broke off and he slid down the wall and vanished from view

 

Granheim talked about his Everest adventure at an event in Norway recently in front of a packed audience

 

With no way of being rescued from the high-altitude mountainside, Granheim had to descend the slopes of Everest alone.When he reached lower ground he immediately told his support team about the fatal accident.

Amazingly they managed to locate Tomas’ body four days later in the snow and they arranged for the first ever helicopter rescue from Everest’s Tibetan side.

Apparently the Swede had been rappelling down a 150-foot rock cliff at around 27,887 feet when a snow anchor broke off and he slid down the wall and vanished from view. Despite the devastating incident on May 16, 2006, Granheim didn’t put his daredevil activities to bed. Most recently he made headlines for being the first Norwegian to summit all 82 peaks of 13,123 feet or above in the Alps.He pushed on at lightning speed, summiting 18 of the technically challenging mountains in just three days.

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Most recently Granheim made headlines for being the first Norwegian to summit all 82 peaks of 13,123 feet or above in the Alps

Revealing where his passion for adventure started, Granheim, who grew up in a small village outside of Oslo, said: ‘I’ve always been very inspired by people who are pushed to their limits.

‘I remember one thing that really inspired me was this Rolex advert on the back of a National Geographic magazine. ‘When I saw this ad I saw a man climbing into the unknown and I wanted to be this man.’

In a video for one of his main sponsors, Bergans of Norway, Granheim explains that mental strength is the main quality needed when traversing the unknown. He also notes that it’s important ‘to have a very solid respect for the limits’. Next up for Granheim? Watch this space!

Source: dailymail.co.uk